As the table above shows, some of the best sources of calcium are dairy products. However, dairy products such as whole milk, cheese, and yogurt also tend to contain high levels of saturated fat. The USDA recommends limiting your saturated fat intake to no more than 10% of your daily calories, meaning you can enjoy whole milk dairy in moderation and opt for no- or low-fat dairy products when possible. Just be aware that reduced fat dairy products often contain lots of added sugar, which can have negative effects on both your health and waistline.
Marina Rae Parker grew up in College Station, TX and has been pursuing her love of dance since she was three through competitive dance in a variety of styles. Marina has always loved teaching and has been assisting dance classes since she was eleven. She decided to continue her dancing career at Sam Houston State University and graduated with honors in May 2015 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance and a minor in General Business. While in college, Marina had the opportunity to learn Creative Movement and has taught at Gibbs Elementary Preschool, Sam Houston State University and now teaches at Holy Cross Learning Center. Marina was also a member and officer of Chi Tau Epsilon Dance Honor Society and had the opportunity to take numerous master classes from a number of distinguished guests. Marina wanted to continue to use her dance training in some form after graduating and had the opportunity to do so through Barre Fitness. She wanted to learn and teach Barre because of the one-of-a-kind work out it gives each individual, while also using some ballet technique and dance related terms and movement. MPOWER provided the chance to fulfill the need of teaching, while also providing a friendly, supportive environment to do so. Marina looks forward to teaching and growing in Barre Fitness with the full support of everyone at MPOWER Fitness. In her spare time Marina enjoys reading many books, going to the movies, playing board games with the family and hanging out with friends.
In addition to his role with MPOWER Fitness, Teddy is a PhD student at Texas A&M. His studies focus on Strategic Management in the Sports Industry. Prior to starting at A&M, Teddy worked as a sports facility consultant for Major League Baseball. He has also worked in the fitness industry as a personal trainer for a nationwide health club and at Florida State University's (FSU) Campus Recreation Center. He earned his Masters of Sports Management from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2013 and his Bachelor's in Political Science from FSU in 2011. In his spare time, he enjoys playing golf, watching football, and reading.
Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

It's even more important for older people to stay hydrated. Age can bring a decreased sensitivity to thirst. Moreover, it's sometime harder for those who are feeble to get up and get something to drink. Or sometimes a problem with incontinence creates a hesitancy to drink enough. Those who are aging should make drinking water throughout the day a priority.
Actually, more people suffer from food intolerances, which don't involve the immune system. However, food intolerance symptoms—such as intestinal distress—may mimic those of a food allergy. If you have a food intolerance, talk to a nutritionist about diagnosis and treatment; if you have food allergies, you need to see an allergist. Whether you have food allergies or intolerance, you will need to develop a diet that fits your needs and avoids foods that trigger a reaction.
A BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight and one 30 or above is considered obese. For an idea of what this means, a 5-foot 5-inch woman who weighs 150 pounds is overweight with a BMI of 25. At 180 pounds, she would be considered obese, with a BMI of 30. Keep in mind that the tables aren't always accurate, especially if you have a high muscle mass; are pregnant, nursing, frail or elderly; or if you are a teenager (i.e., still growing).
In the past, women have often tried to make up deficits in their diet though the use of vitamins and supplements. However, while supplements can be a useful safeguard against occasional nutrient shortfalls, they can’t compensate for an unbalanced or unhealthy diet. To ensure you get all the nutrients you need from the food you eat, try to aim for a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, quality protein, healthy fats, and low in processed, fried, and sugary foods.
You can get calcium from dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese, canned fish with soft bones (sardines, anchovies and salmon; bones must be consumed to get the benefit of calcium), dark-green leafy vegetables (such as kale, mustard greens and turnip greens) and even tofu (if it's processed with calcium sulfate). Some foods are calcium-fortified; that is, they contain additional calcium. Examples include orange juice, certain cereals, soy milk and other breakfast foods. Talk to your health care professional about whether you should take calcium supplements if you don't think you're getting enough calcium from food sources.

Howdy! My name is Amanda. I am a South Texas native and came to College Station to attend Texas A&M University. I received my B.S. in Animal Science and Business Management in 2012. I fell in love with the city and decided I would call it home. I currently co-own Claws and Paws At Home Pet Care and am a Practice Manager at a local veterinary hospital. I became a fitness enthusiast during my journey to lose 70+ lbs. I accomplished this goal through group fitness classes, boot camps, cycling, running clubs and dance. My decision to teach is fueled by my goal to empower others on their fitness journey. I believe in a strong support system and hope to provide that as a fitness instructor. In my down time, I enjoy spending time with my loved ones, running obstacle races and fishing.

My name is Brooke Duncum and I am IBBFA Barre Certified. I grew up in the Sugar Land area of the southwest side of Houston. I started dance at a very young age with a local studio, where I performed, competed, and took classes all over the country. When I got to high school, I joined the dance team, becoming an officer my senior year. I pursued my dance education at the University of Arizona, but after a few years I realized that my love for my home state and family was too great, and moved back to finish my education. I ended with a BS with an emphasis in early child development. After college and as I got older it was harder to stay in the dance world, so I started looking into other forms of group fitness, staring with yoga. Then came spin class, and Bootcamp. I love all forms of group fitness and believe it is very important in our daily lives. A few years ago I learned about the growing love for barre classes, took one and was hooked. It is a great overall, low impact workout that combines ballet and yoga. It helps keep our muscles long and lean. Helps with posture and flexibility, two things that are hard to maintain as we get older. In addition to dance and fitness, I work with my husband building custom homes. I love interior design, spending time with family and friends, music, traveling, and baking
A well-balanced diet, comprised of a variety of foods, adequately meets women’s needs for vitamins, minerals and energy. For good health, women need to pay special attention to calcium, iron and folate (folic acid) intake. A healthy diet also should minimize the intake of fat and sugar. Diets high in saturated or trans fat can promote high levels of blood cholesterol and increase risk for heart disease. A diet that includes high sugar provides empty calories, or calories that do not provide any nutritional value and often times replace more nutritious food selections.
Postmenopausal bleeding is caused by endometrial cancer only 9% of the time, but 91% of women with endometrial cancer have postmenopausal bleeding. For this reason, it’s always important that women have any unusual or postmenopausal bleeding checked by a doctor to rule out endometrial cancer. An ultrasound and biopsy are typically recommended to determine what is causing the bleeding. (Locked) More »
Women's Health magazine focuses on the emotional and physical process of healthy living. Featuring sections such as fitness, food, weight loss, Sex & Relationships, health, Eat This!, style, and beauty, this magazine focuses on the health of the whole woman. Although the magazine is relatively new, the success it has reached since its inception in 2005 speaks volumes about the magazine's ability to connect with women everywhere.
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